The work of photographer Ian Hex.
My mission is to show off the natural beauty of Britain to the world. Also obsessed with typefaces and Beards.
Logo designed by Lucas Cancela of estúdio grampo.

Woolly Barn
This was an unexpected sight to see after shooting Ashness Bridge. How many woolly barns have you seen in your life time? Exactly. Like the interior of this place, this barn was part of the C-Art Project that’s been happening around Cumbria. In particular, this is the work of artist Annabel Lewis who runs V. V. Rouleaux in London.
Bark Barn, Ashness Bridge, Borrowdale, Lake District, Cumbria, England.
“Woolly Barn” by Ian Hex of LightSweep is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. Based on a work at http://www.lightsweep.co.uk.
If you like the way my photos look, I have a free HDR photography tutorial using free and open-source software, so it costs you nothing!
Full-res versions of the photo for personal PC/mobile wallpaper use, as well as enquiries for prints, are available by request, just ask me.

Woolly Barn

This was an unexpected sight to see after shooting Ashness Bridge. How many woolly barns have you seen in your life time? Exactly. Like the interior of this place, this barn was part of the C-Art Project that’s been happening around Cumbria. In particular, this is the work of artist Annabel Lewis who runs V. V. Rouleaux in London.

Bark Barn, Ashness Bridge, Borrowdale, Lake District, Cumbria, England.

Creative Commons Licence
“Woolly Barn” by Ian Hex of LightSweep is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. Based on a work at http://www.lightsweep.co.uk.

If you like the way my photos look, I have a free HDR photography tutorial using free and open-source software, so it costs you nothing!

Full-res versions of the photo for personal PC/mobile wallpaper use, as well as enquiries for prints, are available by request, just ask me.

Set on the Screes
The sun sets behind Yewbarrow, casting beams of liquid amber on The Screes, one of Wastwater’s most recognisable features. The Screes actually comprise of two fells: Illgill Head (609m/1,998ft) and Whin Rigg (535m/1,755ft) that form a ridge directly above the lake. Their southeastern flank is grassy and gentle, covered in bracken and heather, but the northwestern flank as seen from Wastwater plunges directly and steeply into the lake as loose scree and boulders; starting about 2,000ft up and ending up 200ft below the surface. 
Wasdale Head, Lake District, Cumbria, England.
“Set on the Screes” by Ian Hex of LightSweep is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. Based on a work at http://www.lightsweep.co.uk.
If you like the way my photos look, I have a free HDR photography tutorial using free and open-source software, so it costs you nothing!
Full-res versions of the photo for personal PC/mobile wallpaper use, as well as enquiries for prints, are available by request, just ask me.

Set on the Screes

The sun sets behind Yewbarrow, casting beams of liquid amber on The Screes, one of Wastwater’s most recognisable features. The Screes actually comprise of two fells: Illgill Head (609m/1,998ft) and Whin Rigg (535m/1,755ft) that form a ridge directly above the lake. Their southeastern flank is grassy and gentle, covered in bracken and heather, but the northwestern flank as seen from Wastwater plunges directly and steeply into the lake as loose scree and boulders; starting about 2,000ft up and ending up 200ft below the surface. 

Wasdale Head, Lake District, Cumbria, England.

Creative Commons Licence
“Set on the Screes” by Ian Hex of LightSweep is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. Based on a work at http://www.lightsweep.co.uk.

If you like the way my photos look, I have a free HDR photography tutorial using free and open-source software, so it costs you nothing!

Full-res versions of the photo for personal PC/mobile wallpaper use, as well as enquiries for prints, are available by request, just ask me.

Scotland, Here We Come!

Man this is exciting…in a little over a week’s time, Lisabet and I will be crossing the border to explore and photo the sheer delights of Scotland’s world-class landscapes. Words cannot express how excited I am. If you follow my Pinterest Holiday Hoard at all, you’ll note that a large chunk of the places on my wishlist reside in Scotland, particularly the North-Western Highlands and the Hebrides. 

Finally, after what seems like an eternity of waiting, the scenes of my dreams are within reach. I cannot wait to show you guys the results that I come back with! We will be entering peak autumn colours too. And, believe me, we’re prepared for the infamous Scottish weather: waterproofs, multiple layers, proper hiking boots, various sprays (Highland Midges are well-known), waterproof cover for me camera…we’re ready.

Whilst I’m away, internet access will be limited if any at all, so obviously my posting pace will go quiet. Believe me, this will be calm before the storm. I am hoping to shoot some of the best landscapes of my life.

Above, you can see two maps from Google Earth and I’ve pinpointed out the various locations we’re interested in exploring and shooting. Let me know if you’ve been to any of them! Got any tips for me? Let me know. =)

Halfway Through the Peaks
When I shot this composition we were in the prime National Three Peak season. The National Three Peaks Challenge, of the UK, is usually done for charitable purposes and involves climbing three peaks in Scotland, England and Wales in 24 hours: they are Ben Nevis (1,344m/4,409ft), Scafell Pike (978m/3,209ft) and Snowdon/Yr Wyddfa (1,085m/3,560ft) respectively. They tend to be tackled north to south, starting in Scotland, driving through the Lake District in England and ending up in Snowdonia in Wales. This road towards Scafell Pike was rather busy with people looking to take on England’s highest peak.
Scafell Pike, Wasdale, Lake District, Cumbria, England.
“Halfway Through the Peaks” by Ian Hex of LightSweep is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. Based on a work at http://www.lightsweep.co.uk.
If you like the way my photos look, I have a free HDR photography tutorial using free and open-source software, so it costs you nothing!
Full-res versions of the photo for personal PC/mobile wallpaper use, as well as enquiries for prints, are available by request, just ask me.

Halfway Through the Peaks

When I shot this composition we were in the prime National Three Peak season. The National Three Peaks Challenge, of the UK, is usually done for charitable purposes and involves climbing three peaks in Scotland, England and Wales in 24 hours: they are Ben Nevis (1,344m/4,409ft), Scafell Pike (978m/3,209ft) and Snowdon/Yr Wyddfa (1,085m/3,560ft) respectively. They tend to be tackled north to south, starting in Scotland, driving through the Lake District in England and ending up in Snowdonia in Wales. This road towards Scafell Pike was rather busy with people looking to take on England’s highest peak.

Scafell Pike, Wasdale, Lake District, Cumbria, England.

Creative Commons Licence
“Halfway Through the Peaks” by Ian Hex of LightSweep is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. Based on a work at http://www.lightsweep.co.uk.

If you like the way my photos look, I have a free HDR photography tutorial using free and open-source software, so it costs you nothing!

Full-res versions of the photo for personal PC/mobile wallpaper use, as well as enquiries for prints, are available by request, just ask me.

Eye and Horns of Buttermere
As I was heading back from shooting Fleetwith Pike and Haystacks at Warnscale Beck, I took the route that followed the shore of Buttermere as close as possible. On my left, dominating the skyline, stood High Stile (807m/2,648ft) and its two subsidiaries: Red Pike (755m/2,477ft) and High Crag (744m/2,441ft), forming a trio of peaks that fall sharply down to the lake. I stalked through some trees to get the edge of the lake, looking for compositions. I really wanted to get all three peaks into a shot. I ended up taking this composition, positioned at the base of a tree trunk and using the branches to frame and direct the eye towards the impressive peaks. To get this, I shot nine frames at three exposures each and manually blended them altogether in a 3x3 grid to get this final, massively wide angle composition. Overall, I’m quite satisfied.
Buttermere, Lake District, Cumbria, England.
“Eye and Horns of Buttermere” by Ian Hex of LightSweep is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. Based on a work at http://www.lightsweep.co.uk.
If you like the way my photos look, I have a free HDR photography tutorial using free and open-source software, so it costs you nothing!
Full-res versions of the photo for personal PC/mobile wallpaper use, as well as enquiries for prints, are available by request, just ask me.

Eye and Horns of Buttermere

As I was heading back from shooting Fleetwith Pike and Haystacks at Warnscale Beck, I took the route that followed the shore of Buttermere as close as possible. On my left, dominating the skyline, stood High Stile (807m/2,648ft) and its two subsidiaries: Red Pike (755m/2,477ft) and High Crag (744m/2,441ft), forming a trio of peaks that fall sharply down to the lake. I stalked through some trees to get the edge of the lake, looking for compositions. I really wanted to get all three peaks into a shot. I ended up taking this composition, positioned at the base of a tree trunk and using the branches to frame and direct the eye towards the impressive peaks. To get this, I shot nine frames at three exposures each and manually blended them altogether in a 3x3 grid to get this final, massively wide angle composition. Overall, I’m quite satisfied.

Buttermere, Lake District, Cumbria, England.

Creative Commons Licence
“Eye and Horns of Buttermere” by Ian Hex of LightSweep is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. Based on a work at http://www.lightsweep.co.uk.

If you like the way my photos look, I have a free HDR photography tutorial using free and open-source software, so it costs you nothing!

Full-res versions of the photo for personal PC/mobile wallpaper use, as well as enquiries for prints, are available by request, just ask me.

Beauty in Death
Beyond the quintessential Lake District scene at Ashness Bridge, we came across a rather unusual building: an ancient barn covered in wool. Did I take a picture? Hell yes, and you’ll see that one soon. But beyond this rather interesting spectacle sat a young lady deep in concentration, fiddling with a small sheep’s skull. Entering the barn itself revealed why.
Inside, the barn had been converted into an arts exhibition, part of the C-Art movement that’s currently happening in Cumbria. The lady in question was textile artist and sculpture Natalie Williamson and this was her exhibition. I was intrigued by the idea of taking objects of death, such as skulls, and giving them a new “life” through personal creativity. Natalie was thankfully happy for me take a photo of the exhibition room, resulting in this wonderfully moody shot of the barn full of skulls.
Bark Barn, Ashness Bridge, Borrowdale, Lake District, Cumbria, England.
“Beauty in Death” by Ian Hex of LightSweep is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. Based on a work at http://www.lightsweep.co.uk.
If you like the way my photos look, I have a free HDR photography tutorial using free and open-source software, so it costs you nothing!
Full-res versions of the photo for personal PC/mobile wallpaper use, as well as enquiries for prints, are available by request, just ask me.

Beauty in Death

Beyond the quintessential Lake District scene at Ashness Bridge, we came across a rather unusual building: an ancient barn covered in wool. Did I take a picture? Hell yes, and you’ll see that one soon. But beyond this rather interesting spectacle sat a young lady deep in concentration, fiddling with a small sheep’s skull. Entering the barn itself revealed why.

Inside, the barn had been converted into an arts exhibition, part of the C-Art movement that’s currently happening in Cumbria. The lady in question was textile artist and sculpture Natalie Williamson and this was her exhibition. I was intrigued by the idea of taking objects of death, such as skulls, and giving them a new “life” through personal creativity. Natalie was thankfully happy for me take a photo of the exhibition room, resulting in this wonderfully moody shot of the barn full of skulls.

Bark Barn, Ashness Bridge, Borrowdale, Lake District, Cumbria, England.

Creative Commons Licence
“Beauty in Death” by Ian Hex of LightSweep is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. Based on a work at http://www.lightsweep.co.uk.

If you like the way my photos look, I have a free HDR photography tutorial using free and open-source software, so it costs you nothing!

Full-res versions of the photo for personal PC/mobile wallpaper use, as well as enquiries for prints, are available by request, just ask me.

Centuries Old View
This is probably the view of the Lake District and possibly one of the most photographed locations here: this is Ashness Bridge. This ancient packhorse bridge was probably used to enable traffic between the market town of Keswick and the tiny hamlet of Watendlath. It’s popularity is undoubtedly due to the view it offers towards the Skiddaw massif in the distance.
Ashness Bridge, Borrowdale, Lake District, Cumbria, England.
“Centuries Old View” by Ian Hex of LightSweep is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. Based on a work at http://www.lightsweep.co.uk.
If you like the way my photos look, I have a free HDR photography tutorial using free and open-source software, so it costs you nothing!
Full-res versions of the photo for personal PC/mobile wallpaper use, as well as enquiries for prints, are available by request, just ask me.

Centuries Old View

This is probably the view of the Lake District and possibly one of the most photographed locations here: this is Ashness Bridge. This ancient packhorse bridge was probably used to enable traffic between the market town of Keswick and the tiny hamlet of Watendlath. It’s popularity is undoubtedly due to the view it offers towards the Skiddaw massif in the distance.

Ashness Bridge, Borrowdale, Lake District, Cumbria, England.

Creative Commons Licence
“Centuries Old View” by Ian Hex of LightSweep is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. Based on a work at http://www.lightsweep.co.uk.

If you like the way my photos look, I have a free HDR photography tutorial using free and open-source software, so it costs you nothing!

Full-res versions of the photo for personal PC/mobile wallpaper use, as well as enquiries for prints, are available by request, just ask me.

The Lonely Mountain
Fleetwith Pike rises above Gatesgarth Farm, catching a sprinkling of sun. Fleetwith Pike kind of reminds me of Erebor in Lord of the Rings as, like the fictional mountain in the books, Fleetwith Pike contains dozens of mining tunnels within its flanks, in this case rich in high-quality green slate.
Gatesgarth Farm, Buttermere, The Lake District, Cumbria, England.
“The Lonely Mountain” by Ian Hex of LightSweep is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. Based on a work at http://www.lightsweep.co.uk.
If you like the way my photos look, I have a free HDR photography tutorial using free and open-source software, so it costs you nothing!
Full-res versions of the photo for personal PC/mobile wallpaper use, as well as enquiries for prints, are available by request, just ask me.

The Lonely Mountain

Fleetwith Pike rises above Gatesgarth Farm, catching a sprinkling of sun. Fleetwith Pike kind of reminds me of Erebor in Lord of the Rings as, like the fictional mountain in the books, Fleetwith Pike contains dozens of mining tunnels within its flanks, in this case rich in high-quality green slate.

Gatesgarth Farm, Buttermere, The Lake District, Cumbria, England.

Creative Commons Licence
“The Lonely Mountain” by Ian Hex of LightSweep is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. Based on a work at http://www.lightsweep.co.uk.

If you like the way my photos look, I have a free HDR photography tutorial using free and open-source software, so it costs you nothing!

Full-res versions of the photo for personal PC/mobile wallpaper use, as well as enquiries for prints, are available by request, just ask me.

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lightsweep:

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Noted, thank you. =)

Hey, I really like your posts, You've got an awesome blog, Whats your frankly.me handle, want to interview you?

johannadeluna3

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