The work of photographer Ian Hex.
My mission is to show off the natural beauty of Britain to the world. Also obsessed with typefaces and Beards.
Logo designed by Lucas Cancela of estúdio grampo.

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Hey, I really like your posts, You've got an awesome blog, Whats your frankly.me handle, want to interview you?

johannadeluna3

Hello and thank you! I’ve never heard of frankly.me, what is it?

From The Middle of the Lake
As well as enjoying a nice ramble around Coniston and hiking up Tilberthwaite, Lisabet and I splashed out on a boat cruise around Coniston Water itself. It was a thoroughly pleasant experience, being right next to the lapping water and seeing more views surrounding the lake. I continued shooting with my Nikon, sans tripod, but remembered to switch Auto-Bracketing off: there was no way that shooting multiple exposures on a moving boat was going to result in steady photos, so I shot quickfire single exposures, pulling down the Exposure Compensation a little to contain more of the highlights and also making good use of the Hoya Polariser. The shot you see above is made from a single exposure, looking towards the Old Man of Coniston rearing above the village and lakeshore. =)
Coniston Water, Lake District, Cumbria, England.
“From the Middle of the Lake” by Ian Hex of LightSweep.co.uk is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. Based on a work at http://www.lightsweep.co.uk.
If you like the way my photos look, I have a free HDR photography tutorial using free and open-source software, so it costs you nothing!
Full-res versions of the photo for personal PC/mobile wallpaper use, as well as enquiries for prints, are available by request, just ask me.

From The Middle of the Lake

As well as enjoying a nice ramble around Coniston and hiking up Tilberthwaite, Lisabet and I splashed out on a boat cruise around Coniston Water itself. It was a thoroughly pleasant experience, being right next to the lapping water and seeing more views surrounding the lake. I continued shooting with my Nikon, sans tripod, but remembered to switch Auto-Bracketing off: there was no way that shooting multiple exposures on a moving boat was going to result in steady photos, so I shot quickfire single exposures, pulling down the Exposure Compensation a little to contain more of the highlights and also making good use of the Hoya Polariser. The shot you see above is made from a single exposure, looking towards the Old Man of Coniston rearing above the village and lakeshore. =)

Coniston Water, Lake District, Cumbria, England.

Creative Commons Licence
“From the Middle of the Lake” by Ian Hex of LightSweep.co.uk is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. Based on a work at http://www.lightsweep.co.uk.

If you like the way my photos look, I have a free HDR photography tutorial using free and open-source software, so it costs you nothing!

Full-res versions of the photo for personal PC/mobile wallpaper use, as well as enquiries for prints, are available by request, just ask me.

The Magic of Wasdale
Probably the greatest light show I’ve ever witnessed at Wasdale. Fie and I were heading back to the car from the Wasdale Head Inn when I noticed this rather odd/interesting cloud forming above the Scafells, catching the sunset light. I quickly hopped off the road to find some interesting foreground for a composition. I enjoy the hint of autumn in the fern as well as the golden clouds reflecting beautifully in the waters of Wastwater. =)
Wastwater, Lake District, Cumbria, England.
“The Magic of Wasdale” by Ian Hex of LightSweep.co.uk is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. Based on a work at http://www.lightsweep.co.uk.
If you like the way my photos look, I have a free HDR photography tutorial using free and open-source software, so it costs you nothing!
Full-res versions of the photo for personal PC/mobile wallpaper use, as well as enquiries for prints, are available by request, just ask me.

The Magic of Wasdale

Probably the greatest light show I’ve ever witnessed at Wasdale. Fie and I were heading back to the car from the Wasdale Head Inn when I noticed this rather odd/interesting cloud forming above the Scafells, catching the sunset light. I quickly hopped off the road to find some interesting foreground for a composition. I enjoy the hint of autumn in the fern as well as the golden clouds reflecting beautifully in the waters of Wastwater. =)

Wastwater, Lake District, Cumbria, England.

Creative Commons Licence
“The Magic of Wasdale” by Ian Hex of LightSweep.co.uk is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. Based on a work at http://www.lightsweep.co.uk.

If you like the way my photos look, I have a free HDR photography tutorial using free and open-source software, so it costs you nothing!

Full-res versions of the photo for personal PC/mobile wallpaper use, as well as enquiries for prints, are available by request, just ask me.

Straightest River in Lakeland
Yesterday, I decided to take advantage of the dryer weather we were due to experience this week by doing a solo hike around the Central Fells area of the Lake District along with Buttermere. I became aware of a little beck that runs from the fells of Fleetwith Pike (648m/2,126ft), Grey Knotts (697m/2,287ft) and Haystack (597m/1,959ft) into Buttermere known as Warnscale Beck. Judging from the maps, it looked incredibly straight with a tiny little bridge that crosses over it that I thought could offer an excellent composition. Thankfully, I was right. 
The cloud cover was persistent and thick for most of the day, but I had done my research and was expecting it to start breaking up in the mid-late afternoon. In fact, my timing couldn’t have been better; as I approached the bridge that crosses Warnscale Beck, looking towards this scene, the clouds started to break up and the sun spilled golden across the landscape. A beautiful moment captured in a timeless scene. =)
Warnscale Bottom, Buttermere, Lake District, Cumbria, England.
“Straightest River in Lakeland” by Ian Hex of LightSweep is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. Based on a work at http://www.lightsweep.co.uk.
If you like the way my photos look, I have a free HDR photography tutorial using free and open-source software, so it costs you nothing!
Full-res versions of the photo for personal PC/mobile wallpaper use, as well as enquiries for prints, are available by request, just ask me.

Straightest River in Lakeland

Yesterday, I decided to take advantage of the dryer weather we were due to experience this week by doing a solo hike around the Central Fells area of the Lake District along with Buttermere. I became aware of a little beck that runs from the fells of Fleetwith Pike (648m/2,126ft), Grey Knotts (697m/2,287ft) and Haystack (597m/1,959ft) into Buttermere known as Warnscale Beck. Judging from the maps, it looked incredibly straight with a tiny little bridge that crosses over it that I thought could offer an excellent composition. Thankfully, I was right. 

The cloud cover was persistent and thick for most of the day, but I had done my research and was expecting it to start breaking up in the mid-late afternoon. In fact, my timing couldn’t have been better; as I approached the bridge that crosses Warnscale Beck, looking towards this scene, the clouds started to break up and the sun spilled golden across the landscape. A beautiful moment captured in a timeless scene. =)

Warnscale Bottom, Buttermere, Lake District, Cumbria, England.

Creative Commons Licence
“Straightest River in Lakeland” by Ian Hex of LightSweep is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. Based on a work at http://www.lightsweep.co.uk.

If you like the way my photos look, I have a free HDR photography tutorial using free and open-source software, so it costs you nothing!

Full-res versions of the photo for personal PC/mobile wallpaper use, as well as enquiries for prints, are available by request, just ask me.

Artistic Farmer
During our little sojourn in and around Coniston, Lisabet and I came across this field near the village with the gates open. Lisabet alerted me to it because of the beautiful leading lines made by some Lakeland fell farmer’s hay baling efforts. I decided to be a little cheeky and hop into the field to grab some compositions. I took quite a lot of different comps, but mostly I was waiting for the sun to peek out from the clouds and cast soft light across the land, which it finally did here.
Coniston, Lake District, Cumbria, England.
“Artistic Farmer” by Ian Hex of LightSweep.co.uk is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. Based on a work at http://www.lightsweep.co.uk.
If you like the way my photos look, I have a free HDR photography tutorial using free and open-source software, so it costs you nothing!
Full-res versions of the photo for personal PC/mobile wallpaper use, as well as enquiries for prints, are available by request, just ask me.

Artistic Farmer

During our little sojourn in and around Coniston, Lisabet and I came across this field near the village with the gates open. Lisabet alerted me to it because of the beautiful leading lines made by some Lakeland fell farmer’s hay baling efforts. I decided to be a little cheeky and hop into the field to grab some compositions. I took quite a lot of different comps, but mostly I was waiting for the sun to peek out from the clouds and cast soft light across the land, which it finally did here.

Coniston, Lake District, Cumbria, England.

Creative Commons Licence
“Artistic Farmer” by Ian Hex of LightSweep.co.uk is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. Based on a work at http://www.lightsweep.co.uk.

If you like the way my photos look, I have a free HDR photography tutorial using free and open-source software, so it costs you nothing!

Full-res versions of the photo for personal PC/mobile wallpaper use, as well as enquiries for prints, are available by request, just ask me.

They Make Their Own Weather
The Scafell Massif, tallest peaks in England. Viewed from this composition, the Wastwater side, you’d be forgiven for thinking that the peak on the right is the tallest and, therefore, Scafell Pike. In actual fact, the ridge in the middle is taller and is the true Scafell Pike, the peak on the right being plain ol’ Scafell with Lingmell on the left. 
This shot was actually taken with my trusty super-wide angle lens, the Tokina 11-16mm, but I knew that I wanted a much tighter crop as if I had a zoom lens (which I don’t). The final photo must’ve had more than 50% cropped off from the original to get this comp. 
Scafell Pike, Wasdale, Lake District, Cumbria, England.
“They Make Their Own Weather” by Ian Hex of LightSweep.co.uk is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. Based on a work at http://www.lightsweep.co.uk.
If you like the way my photos look, I have a free HDR photography tutorial using free and open-source software, so it costs you nothing!
Full-res versions of the photo for personal PC/mobile wallpaper use, as well as enquiries for prints, are available by request, just ask me!

They Make Their Own Weather

The Scafell Massif, tallest peaks in England. Viewed from this composition, the Wastwater side, you’d be forgiven for thinking that the peak on the right is the tallest and, therefore, Scafell Pike. In actual fact, the ridge in the middle is taller and is the true Scafell Pike, the peak on the right being plain ol’ Scafell with Lingmell on the left. 

This shot was actually taken with my trusty super-wide angle lens, the Tokina 11-16mm, but I knew that I wanted a much tighter crop as if I had a zoom lens (which I don’t). The final photo must’ve had more than 50% cropped off from the original to get this comp. 

Scafell Pike, Wasdale, Lake District, Cumbria, England.

Creative Commons Licence
“They Make Their Own Weather” by Ian Hex of LightSweep.co.uk is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. Based on a work at http://www.lightsweep.co.uk.

If you like the way my photos look, I have a free HDR photography tutorial using free and open-source software, so it costs you nothing!

Full-res versions of the photo for personal PC/mobile wallpaper use, as well as enquiries for prints, are available by request, just ask me!

Mining Heritage
Welcome to Coniston! Sitting at the foot of the Old Man and on the shore of Coniston Water, this pretty little South Lakeland village has a strong heritage in fell farming (particularly Herdwick sheep) and mining, especially copper and slate. It was also well-known for its connection with Beatrix Potter (or Mrs. Heelis to fell farmers), who owned the Monk Coniston Estate and bequeathed it all to the National Trust upon her death, with the condition that her farms continue to breed pure Herdwick sheep, a favourite activity of hers.
This is a composition from the heart of the village, a classic Lakeland scene but with my own personal touch. The fells rising protectively above the village are the Yewdale Fells, looking like a great fist punching the sky. 
Coniston, Lake District, Cumbria, England.
“Mining Heritage” by Ian Hex of LightSweep.co.uk is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. Based on a work at http://www.lightsweep.co.uk.
If you like the way my photos look, I have a free HDR photography tutorial using free and open-source software, so it costs you nothing!
Full-res versions of the photo for personal PC/mobile wallpaper use, as well as enquiries for prints, are available by request, just ask me.

Mining Heritage

Welcome to Coniston! Sitting at the foot of the Old Man and on the shore of Coniston Water, this pretty little South Lakeland village has a strong heritage in fell farming (particularly Herdwick sheep) and mining, especially copper and slate. It was also well-known for its connection with Beatrix Potter (or Mrs. Heelis to fell farmers), who owned the Monk Coniston Estate and bequeathed it all to the National Trust upon her death, with the condition that her farms continue to breed pure Herdwick sheep, a favourite activity of hers.

This is a composition from the heart of the village, a classic Lakeland scene but with my own personal touch. The fells rising protectively above the village are the Yewdale Fells, looking like a great fist punching the sky. 

Coniston, Lake District, Cumbria, England.

Creative Commons Licence
“Mining Heritage” by Ian Hex of LightSweep.co.uk is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. Based on a work at http://www.lightsweep.co.uk.

If you like the way my photos look, I have a free HDR photography tutorial using free and open-source software, so it costs you nothing!

Full-res versions of the photo for personal PC/mobile wallpaper use, as well as enquiries for prints, are available by request, just ask me.

High Up Tilberthwaite
Lisabet and I had a glorious day off the other day, seizing our free time with both hands and teeth. We did a little more venturing around the Southern Lake District, an area we haven’t really touched, particularly Coniston. However, we also explored a little-seen area between Tarn Hows and Coniston, known as Tilberthwaite.
Tilberthwaite is a secluded valley that branches off the main Yewdale valley, which contains Coniston Water. Once a busy area home to many slate mining quarries, these have since been abandoned decades ago and nature has done a wonderful job of reclaiming the land. These days, Tilberthwaite is home to Herdwick sheep dotted around the surrounding fells. This is a composition that I grabbed on the way up Blake Rigg, looking back towards the Tilberthwaite valley and the Central Lake District fells in the distance. =)
High Tilberthwaite, Yewdale, Lake District, Cumbria, England.
“High Up Tilberthwaite” by Ian Hex of LightSweep is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. Based on a work at http://www.lightsweep.co.uk.
If you like the way my photos look, I have a free HDR photography tutorial using free and open-source software, so it costs you nothing!
Full-res versions of the photo for personal PC/mobile wallpaper use, as well as enquiries for prints, are available by request, just ask me.

High Up Tilberthwaite

Lisabet and I had a glorious day off the other day, seizing our free time with both hands and teeth. We did a little more venturing around the Southern Lake District, an area we haven’t really touched, particularly Coniston. However, we also explored a little-seen area between Tarn Hows and Coniston, known as Tilberthwaite.

Tilberthwaite is a secluded valley that branches off the main Yewdale valley, which contains Coniston Water. Once a busy area home to many slate mining quarries, these have since been abandoned decades ago and nature has done a wonderful job of reclaiming the land. These days, Tilberthwaite is home to Herdwick sheep dotted around the surrounding fells. This is a composition that I grabbed on the way up Blake Rigg, looking back towards the Tilberthwaite valley and the Central Lake District fells in the distance. =)

High Tilberthwaite, Yewdale, Lake District, Cumbria, England.

Creative Commons Licence
“High Up Tilberthwaite” by Ian Hex of LightSweep is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. Based on a work at http://www.lightsweep.co.uk.

If you like the way my photos look, I have a free HDR photography tutorial using free and open-source software, so it costs you nothing!

Full-res versions of the photo for personal PC/mobile wallpaper use, as well as enquiries for prints, are available by request, just ask me.

Idyllic Lunch
The sunset view from the beckside dining tables at Wasdale Head Inn. I’m pretty sure you can’t dine in nicer surroundings. The mountain rising behind the tree is Kirk Fell (802m/2,631ft), the name translating as mountain above the church.
Wasdale Head Inn, Wasdale Head, Lake District, Cumbria, England.
“Idyllic Lunch” by Ian Hex of LightSweep is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. Based on a work at http://www.lightsweep.co.uk.
If you like the way my photos look, I have a free HDR photography tutorial using free and open-source software, so it costs you nothing!
Full-res versions of the photo for personal PC/mobile wallpaper use, as well as enquiries for prints, are available by request, just ask me.

Idyllic Lunch

The sunset view from the beckside dining tables at Wasdale Head Inn. I’m pretty sure you can’t dine in nicer surroundings. The mountain rising behind the tree is Kirk Fell (802m/2,631ft), the name translating as mountain above the church.

Wasdale Head Inn, Wasdale Head, Lake District, Cumbria, England.

Creative Commons Licence
“Idyllic Lunch” by Ian Hex of LightSweep is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. Based on a work at http://www.lightsweep.co.uk.

If you like the way my photos look, I have a free HDR photography tutorial using free and open-source software, so it costs you nothing!

Full-res versions of the photo for personal PC/mobile wallpaper use, as well as enquiries for prints, are available by request, just ask me.

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