The work of photographer Ian Hex.
My mission is to show off the natural beauty of Britain to the world. Also obsessed with typefaces and Beards.
Logo designed by Lucas Cancela of estúdio grampo.

Britain’s Patagonia
Our first week in Glencoe was an unparalleled success, so we entered our second week on the Isle of Skye with high spirits and optimistic expectations. One of the top locations was Sligachan, (meaning “small shells” and pronounced as SLEE-ga-hhan) a small settlement around the centre of Skye. It’s known for three things: the hotel, the old bridge and the view towards Britain’s most dramatic mountain range, the Black Cuillins.
This mountain range, though not particularly tall (the tallest peak, Sgùrr Alasdair, is only 992m/3,255ft), is particularly rugged, jagged and alpine, owing to it being primarily made of tough, coarse gabbro rock. It is also Britain’s youngest mountain range. From the Sligachan river seen in this composition you see the more northern face of the Black Cuillins, presented as two “horns”: the left peak is Sgùrr nan Gillean (“Peak of the Young Men”) and the right is called Sgùrr a’Bhasteir. Navigating the river after fresh rain proved rather interesting but I eventually settled on this spot so that I could show the winding of the River Sligachan pointing towards the impressive peaks of the Black Cuillin as warm morning light cast delicious golden light across the scene.
River Sligachan, Sligachan, Isle of Skye, Hebrides, Scotland.
“Britain’s Patagonia” by Ian Hex of LightSweep is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. Based on a work at http://www.lightsweep.co.uk.
If you like the way my photos look, I have a free HDR photography tutorial using free and open-source software, so it costs you nothing!
Full-res versions of the photo for personal PC/mobile wallpaper use, as well as enquiries for prints, are available by request, just ask me.

Britain’s Patagonia

Our first week in Glencoe was an unparalleled success, so we entered our second week on the Isle of Skye with high spirits and optimistic expectations. One of the top locations was Sligachan, (meaning “small shells” and pronounced as SLEE-ga-hhan) a small settlement around the centre of Skye. It’s known for three things: the hotel, the old bridge and the view towards Britain’s most dramatic mountain range, the Black Cuillins.

This mountain range, though not particularly tall (the tallest peak, Sgùrr Alasdair, is only 992m/3,255ft), is particularly rugged, jagged and alpine, owing to it being primarily made of tough, coarse gabbro rock. It is also Britain’s youngest mountain range. From the Sligachan river seen in this composition you see the more northern face of the Black Cuillins, presented as two “horns”: the left peak is Sgùrr nan Gillean (“Peak of the Young Men”) and the right is called Sgùrr a’Bhasteir. Navigating the river after fresh rain proved rather interesting but I eventually settled on this spot so that I could show the winding of the River Sligachan pointing towards the impressive peaks of the Black Cuillin as warm morning light cast delicious golden light across the scene.

River Sligachan, Sligachan, Isle of Skye, Hebrides, Scotland.

Creative Commons Licence
“Britain’s Patagonia” by Ian Hex of LightSweep is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. Based on a work at http://www.lightsweep.co.uk.

If you like the way my photos look, I have a free HDR photography tutorial using free and open-source software, so it costs you nothing!

Full-res versions of the photo for personal PC/mobile wallpaper use, as well as enquiries for prints, are available by request, just ask me.

Greetings to the Third Sister
I’m back. Did you miss me? =D
Lisabet and I had a truly wonderful time in Scotland. One week in Glencoe, one week on Skye. The Lisabet Blessing was on our side again as the weather, 95% of the time, treated us very well… and even when it didn’t, it still proved advantageous.
Which links me to this shot. Welcome to Glencoe! This composition was taken off the Glencoe Pass, right at the Glen bottom near the Old Military Road. The mountain you can see is the third of the Three Sisters of Glencoe, known as Aonach Dubh (892m/2,927ft), which means “The Black Ridge”, pronounced as OO-nakh-doo. In actuality, it’s just a ridge rather than a mountain in its own right, jutting north from the main massif belonging to Bidean nam Bian (1,150m/3,770ft), meaning “Peak of the Animal Pelts” or “Peak of the Mountains”, pronounced as bit-yan nam BE-ahn. We had been scouting around the feet of the Three Sisters in the rain, looking for compositions and interesting routes. As the rain finally started to calm down, and the cloud cover lifted from the peaks, the sun was allowed to break through to the west, illuminating the glen and casting glorious colours everywhere. This is a stitch of two landscape shots, each consisting of three exposures, so that I could get all of Aonach Dubh as well as these lovely pink flowers near the river. =)
Glencoe Pass, Glencoe, Argyll & Bute, Highlands, Scotland
“Greetings to the Third Sister” by Ian Hex of LightSweep.co.uk is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. Based on a work at http://www.lightsweep.co.uk.
If you like the way my photos look, I have a free HDR photography tutorial using free and open-source software, so it costs you nothing!
Full-res versions of the photo for personal PC/mobile wallpaper use, as well as enquiries for prints, are available by request, just ask me.

Greetings to the Third Sister

I’m back. Did you miss me? =D

Lisabet and I had a truly wonderful time in Scotland. One week in Glencoe, one week on Skye. The Lisabet Blessing was on our side again as the weather, 95% of the time, treated us very well… and even when it didn’t, it still proved advantageous.

Which links me to this shot. Welcome to Glencoe! This composition was taken off the Glencoe Pass, right at the Glen bottom near the Old Military Road. The mountain you can see is the third of the Three Sisters of Glencoe, known as Aonach Dubh (892m/2,927ft), which means “The Black Ridge”, pronounced as OO-nakh-doo. In actuality, it’s just a ridge rather than a mountain in its own right, jutting north from the main massif belonging to Bidean nam Bian (1,150m/3,770ft), meaning “Peak of the Animal Pelts” or “Peak of the Mountains”, pronounced as bit-yan nam BE-ahn. We had been scouting around the feet of the Three Sisters in the rain, looking for compositions and interesting routes. As the rain finally started to calm down, and the cloud cover lifted from the peaks, the sun was allowed to break through to the west, illuminating the glen and casting glorious colours everywhere. This is a stitch of two landscape shots, each consisting of three exposures, so that I could get all of Aonach Dubh as well as these lovely pink flowers near the river. =)

Glencoe Pass, Glencoe, Argyll & Bute, Highlands, Scotland

Creative Commons Licence
“Greetings to the Third Sister” by Ian Hex of LightSweep.co.uk is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. Based on a work at http://www.lightsweep.co.uk.

If you like the way my photos look, I have a free HDR photography tutorial using free and open-source software, so it costs you nothing!

Full-res versions of the photo for personal PC/mobile wallpaper use, as well as enquiries for prints, are available by request, just ask me.

Haziest of Summers
The vista from Surprise View near Ashness Bridge, across Derwentwater towards Skiddaw as the sun was setting on an extremely hazy summer’s day.
Well now, this will be my last “proper” post here until I get back from our trip to Scotland! Preparations are nearly complete, and we as ready as we’ll ever be. We will have wi-fi where we’re staying but I don’t have a laptop so I can’t process and publish new work on the go. I will be documenting my travels with my phone though, so you’ll see mobile photos and small posts over on my Google+ Profile as well as on Twitter. Keep a wee eye on those for tantalising updates!
Until next time…
Surprise View, Ashness Bridge, Borrowdale, Lake District, Cumbria, England.
“Haziest of Summers” by Ian Hex of LightSweep is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. Based on a work at http://www.lightsweep.co.uk.
If you like the way my photos look, I have a free HDR photography tutorial using free and open-source software, so it costs you nothing!
Full-res versions of the photo for personal PC/mobile wallpaper use, as well as enquiries for prints, are available by request, just ask me.

Haziest of Summers

The vista from Surprise View near Ashness Bridge, across Derwentwater towards Skiddaw as the sun was setting on an extremely hazy summer’s day.

Well now, this will be my last “proper” post here until I get back from our trip to Scotland! Preparations are nearly complete, and we as ready as we’ll ever be. We will have wi-fi where we’re staying but I don’t have a laptop so I can’t process and publish new work on the go. I will be documenting my travels with my phone though, so you’ll see mobile photos and small posts over on my Google+ Profile as well as on Twitter. Keep a wee eye on those for tantalising updates!

Until next time…

Surprise View, Ashness Bridge, Borrowdale, Lake District, Cumbria, England.

Creative Commons Licence
“Haziest of Summers” by Ian Hex of LightSweep is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. Based on a work at http://www.lightsweep.co.uk.

If you like the way my photos look, I have a free HDR photography tutorial using free and open-source software, so it costs you nothing!

Full-res versions of the photo for personal PC/mobile wallpaper use, as well as enquiries for prints, are available by request, just ask me.

Woolly Barn
This was an unexpected sight to see after shooting Ashness Bridge. How many woolly barns have you seen in your life time? Exactly. Like the interior of this place, this barn was part of the C-Art Project that’s been happening around Cumbria. In particular, this is the work of artist Annabel Lewis who runs V. V. Rouleaux in London.
Bark Barn, Ashness Bridge, Borrowdale, Lake District, Cumbria, England.
“Woolly Barn” by Ian Hex of LightSweep is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. Based on a work at http://www.lightsweep.co.uk.
If you like the way my photos look, I have a free HDR photography tutorial using free and open-source software, so it costs you nothing!
Full-res versions of the photo for personal PC/mobile wallpaper use, as well as enquiries for prints, are available by request, just ask me.

Woolly Barn

This was an unexpected sight to see after shooting Ashness Bridge. How many woolly barns have you seen in your life time? Exactly. Like the interior of this place, this barn was part of the C-Art Project that’s been happening around Cumbria. In particular, this is the work of artist Annabel Lewis who runs V. V. Rouleaux in London.

Bark Barn, Ashness Bridge, Borrowdale, Lake District, Cumbria, England.

Creative Commons Licence
“Woolly Barn” by Ian Hex of LightSweep is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. Based on a work at http://www.lightsweep.co.uk.

If you like the way my photos look, I have a free HDR photography tutorial using free and open-source software, so it costs you nothing!

Full-res versions of the photo for personal PC/mobile wallpaper use, as well as enquiries for prints, are available by request, just ask me.

Set on the Screes
The sun sets behind Yewbarrow, casting beams of liquid amber on The Screes, one of Wastwater’s most recognisable features. The Screes actually comprise of two fells: Illgill Head (609m/1,998ft) and Whin Rigg (535m/1,755ft) that form a ridge directly above the lake. Their southeastern flank is grassy and gentle, covered in bracken and heather, but the northwestern flank as seen from Wastwater plunges directly and steeply into the lake as loose scree and boulders; starting about 2,000ft up and ending up 200ft below the surface. 
Wasdale Head, Lake District, Cumbria, England.
“Set on the Screes” by Ian Hex of LightSweep is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. Based on a work at http://www.lightsweep.co.uk.
If you like the way my photos look, I have a free HDR photography tutorial using free and open-source software, so it costs you nothing!
Full-res versions of the photo for personal PC/mobile wallpaper use, as well as enquiries for prints, are available by request, just ask me.

Set on the Screes

The sun sets behind Yewbarrow, casting beams of liquid amber on The Screes, one of Wastwater’s most recognisable features. The Screes actually comprise of two fells: Illgill Head (609m/1,998ft) and Whin Rigg (535m/1,755ft) that form a ridge directly above the lake. Their southeastern flank is grassy and gentle, covered in bracken and heather, but the northwestern flank as seen from Wastwater plunges directly and steeply into the lake as loose scree and boulders; starting about 2,000ft up and ending up 200ft below the surface. 

Wasdale Head, Lake District, Cumbria, England.

Creative Commons Licence
“Set on the Screes” by Ian Hex of LightSweep is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. Based on a work at http://www.lightsweep.co.uk.

If you like the way my photos look, I have a free HDR photography tutorial using free and open-source software, so it costs you nothing!

Full-res versions of the photo for personal PC/mobile wallpaper use, as well as enquiries for prints, are available by request, just ask me.

Scotland, Here We Come!

Man this is exciting…in a little over a week’s time, Lisabet and I will be crossing the border to explore and photo the sheer delights of Scotland’s world-class landscapes. Words cannot express how excited I am. If you follow my Pinterest Holiday Hoard at all, you’ll note that a large chunk of the places on my wishlist reside in Scotland, particularly the North-Western Highlands and the Hebrides. 

Finally, after what seems like an eternity of waiting, the scenes of my dreams are within reach. I cannot wait to show you guys the results that I come back with! We will be entering peak autumn colours too. And, believe me, we’re prepared for the infamous Scottish weather: waterproofs, multiple layers, proper hiking boots, various sprays (Highland Midges are well-known), waterproof cover for me camera…we’re ready.

Whilst I’m away, internet access will be limited if any at all, so obviously my posting pace will go quiet. Believe me, this will be calm before the storm. I am hoping to shoot some of the best landscapes of my life.

Above, you can see two maps from Google Earth and I’ve pinpointed out the various locations we’re interested in exploring and shooting. Let me know if you’ve been to any of them! Got any tips for me? Let me know. =)

Halfway Through the Peaks
When I shot this composition we were in the prime National Three Peak season. The National Three Peaks Challenge, of the UK, is usually done for charitable purposes and involves climbing three peaks in Scotland, England and Wales in 24 hours: they are Ben Nevis (1,344m/4,409ft), Scafell Pike (978m/3,209ft) and Snowdon/Yr Wyddfa (1,085m/3,560ft) respectively. They tend to be tackled north to south, starting in Scotland, driving through the Lake District in England and ending up in Snowdonia in Wales. This road towards Scafell Pike was rather busy with people looking to take on England’s highest peak.
Scafell Pike, Wasdale, Lake District, Cumbria, England.
“Halfway Through the Peaks” by Ian Hex of LightSweep is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. Based on a work at http://www.lightsweep.co.uk.
If you like the way my photos look, I have a free HDR photography tutorial using free and open-source software, so it costs you nothing!
Full-res versions of the photo for personal PC/mobile wallpaper use, as well as enquiries for prints, are available by request, just ask me.

Halfway Through the Peaks

When I shot this composition we were in the prime National Three Peak season. The National Three Peaks Challenge, of the UK, is usually done for charitable purposes and involves climbing three peaks in Scotland, England and Wales in 24 hours: they are Ben Nevis (1,344m/4,409ft), Scafell Pike (978m/3,209ft) and Snowdon/Yr Wyddfa (1,085m/3,560ft) respectively. They tend to be tackled north to south, starting in Scotland, driving through the Lake District in England and ending up in Snowdonia in Wales. This road towards Scafell Pike was rather busy with people looking to take on England’s highest peak.

Scafell Pike, Wasdale, Lake District, Cumbria, England.

Creative Commons Licence
“Halfway Through the Peaks” by Ian Hex of LightSweep is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. Based on a work at http://www.lightsweep.co.uk.

If you like the way my photos look, I have a free HDR photography tutorial using free and open-source software, so it costs you nothing!

Full-res versions of the photo for personal PC/mobile wallpaper use, as well as enquiries for prints, are available by request, just ask me.

Eye and Horns of Buttermere
As I was heading back from shooting Fleetwith Pike and Haystacks at Warnscale Beck, I took the route that followed the shore of Buttermere as close as possible. On my left, dominating the skyline, stood High Stile (807m/2,648ft) and its two subsidiaries: Red Pike (755m/2,477ft) and High Crag (744m/2,441ft), forming a trio of peaks that fall sharply down to the lake. I stalked through some trees to get the edge of the lake, looking for compositions. I really wanted to get all three peaks into a shot. I ended up taking this composition, positioned at the base of a tree trunk and using the branches to frame and direct the eye towards the impressive peaks. To get this, I shot nine frames at three exposures each and manually blended them altogether in a 3x3 grid to get this final, massively wide angle composition. Overall, I’m quite satisfied.
Buttermere, Lake District, Cumbria, England.
“Eye and Horns of Buttermere” by Ian Hex of LightSweep is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. Based on a work at http://www.lightsweep.co.uk.
If you like the way my photos look, I have a free HDR photography tutorial using free and open-source software, so it costs you nothing!
Full-res versions of the photo for personal PC/mobile wallpaper use, as well as enquiries for prints, are available by request, just ask me.

Eye and Horns of Buttermere

As I was heading back from shooting Fleetwith Pike and Haystacks at Warnscale Beck, I took the route that followed the shore of Buttermere as close as possible. On my left, dominating the skyline, stood High Stile (807m/2,648ft) and its two subsidiaries: Red Pike (755m/2,477ft) and High Crag (744m/2,441ft), forming a trio of peaks that fall sharply down to the lake. I stalked through some trees to get the edge of the lake, looking for compositions. I really wanted to get all three peaks into a shot. I ended up taking this composition, positioned at the base of a tree trunk and using the branches to frame and direct the eye towards the impressive peaks. To get this, I shot nine frames at three exposures each and manually blended them altogether in a 3x3 grid to get this final, massively wide angle composition. Overall, I’m quite satisfied.

Buttermere, Lake District, Cumbria, England.

Creative Commons Licence
“Eye and Horns of Buttermere” by Ian Hex of LightSweep is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. Based on a work at http://www.lightsweep.co.uk.

If you like the way my photos look, I have a free HDR photography tutorial using free and open-source software, so it costs you nothing!

Full-res versions of the photo for personal PC/mobile wallpaper use, as well as enquiries for prints, are available by request, just ask me.

Beauty in Death
Beyond the quintessential Lake District scene at Ashness Bridge, we came across a rather unusual building: an ancient barn covered in wool. Did I take a picture? Hell yes, and you’ll see that one soon. But beyond this rather interesting spectacle sat a young lady deep in concentration, fiddling with a small sheep’s skull. Entering the barn itself revealed why.
Inside, the barn had been converted into an arts exhibition, part of the C-Art movement that’s currently happening in Cumbria. The lady in question was textile artist and sculpture Natalie Williamson and this was her exhibition. I was intrigued by the idea of taking objects of death, such as skulls, and giving them a new “life” through personal creativity. Natalie was thankfully happy for me take a photo of the exhibition room, resulting in this wonderfully moody shot of the barn full of skulls.
Bark Barn, Ashness Bridge, Borrowdale, Lake District, Cumbria, England.
“Beauty in Death” by Ian Hex of LightSweep is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. Based on a work at http://www.lightsweep.co.uk.
If you like the way my photos look, I have a free HDR photography tutorial using free and open-source software, so it costs you nothing!
Full-res versions of the photo for personal PC/mobile wallpaper use, as well as enquiries for prints, are available by request, just ask me.

Beauty in Death

Beyond the quintessential Lake District scene at Ashness Bridge, we came across a rather unusual building: an ancient barn covered in wool. Did I take a picture? Hell yes, and you’ll see that one soon. But beyond this rather interesting spectacle sat a young lady deep in concentration, fiddling with a small sheep’s skull. Entering the barn itself revealed why.

Inside, the barn had been converted into an arts exhibition, part of the C-Art movement that’s currently happening in Cumbria. The lady in question was textile artist and sculpture Natalie Williamson and this was her exhibition. I was intrigued by the idea of taking objects of death, such as skulls, and giving them a new “life” through personal creativity. Natalie was thankfully happy for me take a photo of the exhibition room, resulting in this wonderfully moody shot of the barn full of skulls.

Bark Barn, Ashness Bridge, Borrowdale, Lake District, Cumbria, England.

Creative Commons Licence
“Beauty in Death” by Ian Hex of LightSweep is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. Based on a work at http://www.lightsweep.co.uk.

If you like the way my photos look, I have a free HDR photography tutorial using free and open-source software, so it costs you nothing!

Full-res versions of the photo for personal PC/mobile wallpaper use, as well as enquiries for prints, are available by request, just ask me.

Centuries Old View
This is probably the view of the Lake District and possibly one of the most photographed locations here: this is Ashness Bridge. This ancient packhorse bridge was probably used to enable traffic between the market town of Keswick and the tiny hamlet of Watendlath. It’s popularity is undoubtedly due to the view it offers towards the Skiddaw massif in the distance.
Ashness Bridge, Borrowdale, Lake District, Cumbria, England.
“Centuries Old View” by Ian Hex of LightSweep is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. Based on a work at http://www.lightsweep.co.uk.
If you like the way my photos look, I have a free HDR photography tutorial using free and open-source software, so it costs you nothing!
Full-res versions of the photo for personal PC/mobile wallpaper use, as well as enquiries for prints, are available by request, just ask me.

Centuries Old View

This is probably the view of the Lake District and possibly one of the most photographed locations here: this is Ashness Bridge. This ancient packhorse bridge was probably used to enable traffic between the market town of Keswick and the tiny hamlet of Watendlath. It’s popularity is undoubtedly due to the view it offers towards the Skiddaw massif in the distance.

Ashness Bridge, Borrowdale, Lake District, Cumbria, England.

Creative Commons Licence
“Centuries Old View” by Ian Hex of LightSweep is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. Based on a work at http://www.lightsweep.co.uk.

If you like the way my photos look, I have a free HDR photography tutorial using free and open-source software, so it costs you nothing!

Full-res versions of the photo for personal PC/mobile wallpaper use, as well as enquiries for prints, are available by request, just ask me.

© LightSweep

Theme by Dubious Radical. Logo by Lucas Cancela of estúdio grampo.