The work of photographer Ian Hex.
My mission is to show off the natural beauty of Britain to the world. Also obsessed with typefaces and Beards.
Logo designed by Lucas Cancela of estúdio grampo.

The Fishing Harbour
The hidden and ancient fishing village of Staithes catches the last light of the setting sun. 
Staithes, Scarborough, North Yorkshire, England.
“The Fishing Harbour” by Ian Hex of LightSweep is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. Based on a work at http://www.lightsweep.co.uk.
If you like the way my photos look, I have a free HDR photography tutorial using free and open-source software, so it costs you nothing!
Full-res versions of the photo for personal PC/mobile wallpaper use, as well as enquiries for prints, are available by request, just ask me.

The Fishing Harbour

The hidden and ancient fishing village of Staithes catches the last light of the setting sun. 

Staithes, Scarborough, North Yorkshire, England.

Creative Commons Licence
“The Fishing Harbour” by Ian Hex of LightSweep is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. Based on a work at http://www.lightsweep.co.uk.

If you like the way my photos look, I have a free HDR photography tutorial using free and open-source software, so it costs you nothing!

Full-res versions of the photo for personal PC/mobile wallpaper use, as well as enquiries for prints, are available by request, just ask me.

Walking Waterfall
The gorge cut by High Force sees the last of the autumn sunlight as the boulders and fall foliage glow. 
High Force, Forest-in-Teesdale, County Durham, England.
Camera: Nikon D7000
Lens: Tokina AT-X 116 PRO DX (AF 11-16mm f/2.8)
ISO: 100
Aperture: f/14
Focal Length: 11mm
Shutter Speeds: 1/6, 1/3, 0.6, 1.3, 2.5, 5.0, 10.0, 20.0 and 30.0secs
“Walking Waterfall” by Ian Hex of LightSweep is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. Based on a work at http://www.lightsweep.co.uk.
If you like the way my photos look, I have a free HDR photography tutorial using free and open-source software, so it costs you nothing!
Full-res versions of the photo for personal PC/mobile wallpaper use, as well as enquiries for prints, are available by request, just ask me.

Walking Waterfall

The gorge cut by High Force sees the last of the autumn sunlight as the boulders and fall foliage glow. 

High Force, Forest-in-Teesdale, County Durham, England.

  • Camera: Nikon D7000
  • Lens: Tokina AT-X 116 PRO DX (AF 11-16mm f/2.8)
  • ISO: 100
  • Aperture: f/14
  • Focal Length: 11mm
  • Shutter Speeds: 1/6, 1/3, 0.6, 1.3, 2.5, 5.0, 10.0, 20.0 and 30.0secs

Creative Commons Licence
“Walking Waterfall” by Ian Hex of LightSweep is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. Based on a work at http://www.lightsweep.co.uk.

If you like the way my photos look, I have a free HDR photography tutorial using free and open-source software, so it costs you nothing!

Full-res versions of the photo for personal PC/mobile wallpaper use, as well as enquiries for prints, are available by request, just ask me.

Herdwicks of Langdale
This was my final shot from near the summit of Wrynose Pass. I had to do a little bit of bog-hopping in order to gain access to this mound that offered the view you see here. Isn’t it beautiful? The light was exactly what I was looking for; stormy, multi-layered clouds with occasional break of sun. The sweeping valley is Little Langdale, with the river running towards the distant tarn of Little Langdale Tarn being Widdy Gill, which eventually becomes the River Brathay. The fell illuminated on the right is Knott Head. Below where I’m standing in the composition, you can see the cute mountain sheep endemic to the Lake District, Herdwicks, snoozing and cudding in the afternoon sun. 
Wrynose Pass, Little Langdale, Lake District, Cumbria, England.
Camera: Nikon D7000
Lens: Tokina AT-X 116 PRO DX (AF 11-16mm f/2.8)
Filters: Hoya PRO-1 Circular Polariser
ISO: 100
Aperture: f/8
Focal Length: 16mm
Shutter Speeds: 1/160, 1/40, 1/10secs
“Herdwicks of Langdale” by Ian Hex of LightSweep is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. Based on a work at http://www.lightsweep.co.uk.
If you like the way my photos look, I have a free HDR photography tutorial using free and open-source software, so it costs you nothing!
Full-res versions of the photo for personal PC/mobile wallpaper use, as well as enquiries for prints, are available by request, just ask me.

Herdwicks of Langdale

This was my final shot from near the summit of Wrynose Pass. I had to do a little bit of bog-hopping in order to gain access to this mound that offered the view you see here. Isn’t it beautiful? The light was exactly what I was looking for; stormy, multi-layered clouds with occasional break of sun. The sweeping valley is Little Langdale, with the river running towards the distant tarn of Little Langdale Tarn being Widdy Gill, which eventually becomes the River Brathay. The fell illuminated on the right is Knott Head. Below where I’m standing in the composition, you can see the cute mountain sheep endemic to the Lake District, Herdwicks, snoozing and cudding in the afternoon sun. 

Wrynose Pass, Little Langdale, Lake District, Cumbria, England.

  • Camera: Nikon D7000
  • Lens: Tokina AT-X 116 PRO DX (AF 11-16mm f/2.8)
  • Filters: Hoya PRO-1 Circular Polariser
  • ISO: 100
  • Aperture: f/8
  • Focal Length: 16mm
  • Shutter Speeds: 1/160, 1/40, 1/10secs

Creative Commons Licence
“Herdwicks of Langdale” by Ian Hex of LightSweep is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. Based on a work at http://www.lightsweep.co.uk.

If you like the way my photos look, I have a free HDR photography tutorial using free and open-source software, so it costs you nothing!

Full-res versions of the photo for personal PC/mobile wallpaper use, as well as enquiries for prints, are available by request, just ask me.

The People’s Paradise
After navigating down Wrynose Pass through Little Langdale to head back home, I realised that I was near Blea Tarn and, well, I couldn’t resist. I turned off the Little Langdale road onto the single track lane that heads towards this incredible place.
There were, unfortunately, no reflections on the tarn this time, but the Langdale Pikes were looking as spectacular as ever and the cloud system filtered the light wonderfully. I bog-hopped my way down to the shore to grab this composition as the Langdale Pikes were illuminated by a brief burst of sunlight.
Blea Tarn, Little Langdale, Lake District, Cumbria, England.
Camera: Nikon D7000
Lens: Tokina AT-X 116 PRO DX (AF 11-16mm f/2.8)
Filters: Hoya PRO-1 Circular Polariser
ISO: 100
Aperture: f/11
Focal Length: 13mm
Shutter Speeds: 1/200, 1/50 and 1/13secs
Other: A few perspective alterations were made to correct the shrinking of the mountains that an ultra-wide angle lens causes.
“The People’s Paradise” by Ian Hex of LightSweep is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. Based on a work at http://www.lightsweep.co.uk.
If you like the way my photos look, I have a free HDR photography tutorial using free and open-source software, so it costs you nothing!
Full-res versions of the photo for personal PC/mobile wallpaper use, as well as enquiries for prints, are available by request, just ask me.

The People’s Paradise

After navigating down Wrynose Pass through Little Langdale to head back home, I realised that I was near Blea Tarn and, well, I couldn’t resist. I turned off the Little Langdale road onto the single track lane that heads towards this incredible place.

There were, unfortunately, no reflections on the tarn this time, but the Langdale Pikes were looking as spectacular as ever and the cloud system filtered the light wonderfully. I bog-hopped my way down to the shore to grab this composition as the Langdale Pikes were illuminated by a brief burst of sunlight.

Blea Tarn, Little Langdale, Lake District, Cumbria, England.

  • Camera: Nikon D7000
  • Lens: Tokina AT-X 116 PRO DX (AF 11-16mm f/2.8)
  • Filters: Hoya PRO-1 Circular Polariser
  • ISO: 100
  • Aperture: f/11
  • Focal Length: 13mm
  • Shutter Speeds: 1/200, 1/50 and 1/13secs
  • Other: A few perspective alterations were made to correct the shrinking of the mountains that an ultra-wide angle lens causes.

Creative Commons Licence
“The People’s Paradise” by Ian Hex of LightSweep is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. Based on a work at http://www.lightsweep.co.uk.

If you like the way my photos look, I have a free HDR photography tutorial using free and open-source software, so it costs you nothing!

Full-res versions of the photo for personal PC/mobile wallpaper use, as well as enquiries for prints, are available by request, just ask me.

The Cusp of Seasons
The Duddon valley (or Dunnerdale) is somewhere that I’ve always vaguely heard about but never touched. By all accounts, in comparison with many other places in the Lake District, Duddon is one of the more remote, isolated, empty, and untouched areas in the Lake District. I made my way here from Kendal one gloomy morning after a tip-off from Cumbria Tourism. After driving down and around the southern edge of the Lake District, I broke off from the main road towards Ulpha. This was a route Lisabet and I had done before in order to get to Boot, but instead of driving up and over Birk Fell I turned east and up the Duddon valley. 
Along the way, I could hear the sound of rushing water right by the road, so I pulled up next to this bridge I later recognised as Birks Bridge. And then I found the scene above. This is Froth Pot, a gorge cut into the River Duddon where the water rushes through the narrow and deep ravine with tremendous force. I navigated the slippery boulders to perch myself on top of a little mound to I grab this vantage point. Purple heather has started to grow in the Lakes and, with the changing colour of the grass, Cold Pike in the distance and stormy clouds above, this scene has a very Scottish feel that I really dig.
Birks Bridge, Duddon Valley, Lake District, Cumbria, England.
Camera: Nikon D7000
Lens: Tokina AT-X 116 PRO DX (AF 11-16mm f/2.8)
Filters: Hoya PRO-1 Circular Polariser
ISO: 100
Aperture: f/13
Focal Length: 12mm
Shutter Speeds: 1/25, 1/6 and 0.6secs
“The Cusp of Seasons” by Ian Hex of LightSweep is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. Based on a work at http://www.lightsweep.co.uk.
If you like the way my photos look, I have a free HDR photography tutorial using free and open-source software, so it costs you nothing!
Full-res versions of the photo for personal PC/mobile wallpaper use, as well as enquiries for prints, are available by request, just ask me.

The Cusp of Seasons

The Duddon valley (or Dunnerdale) is somewhere that I’ve always vaguely heard about but never touched. By all accounts, in comparison with many other places in the Lake District, Duddon is one of the more remote, isolated, empty, and untouched areas in the Lake District. I made my way here from Kendal one gloomy morning after a tip-off from Cumbria Tourism. After driving down and around the southern edge of the Lake District, I broke off from the main road towards Ulpha. This was a route Lisabet and I had done before in order to get to Boot, but instead of driving up and over Birk Fell I turned east and up the Duddon valley

Along the way, I could hear the sound of rushing water right by the road, so I pulled up next to this bridge I later recognised as Birks Bridge. And then I found the scene above. This is Froth Pot, a gorge cut into the River Duddon where the water rushes through the narrow and deep ravine with tremendous force. I navigated the slippery boulders to perch myself on top of a little mound to I grab this vantage point. Purple heather has started to grow in the Lakes and, with the changing colour of the grass, Cold Pike in the distance and stormy clouds above, this scene has a very Scottish feel that I really dig.

Birks Bridge, Duddon Valley, Lake District, Cumbria, England.

  • Camera: Nikon D7000
  • Lens: Tokina AT-X 116 PRO DX (AF 11-16mm f/2.8)
  • Filters: Hoya PRO-1 Circular Polariser
  • ISO: 100
  • Aperture: f/13
  • Focal Length: 12mm
  • Shutter Speeds: 1/25, 1/6 and 0.6secs

Creative Commons Licence
“The Cusp of Seasons” by Ian Hex of LightSweep is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. Based on a work at http://www.lightsweep.co.uk.

If you like the way my photos look, I have a free HDR photography tutorial using free and open-source software, so it costs you nothing!

Full-res versions of the photo for personal PC/mobile wallpaper use, as well as enquiries for prints, are available by request, just ask me.

The Dividing Road
We’ve entered into that interesting cusp between Summer and Autumn, where the colours of the landscape, along with the weather, start to change. After just over two months of glorious sunshine, a harsh reminder of the UK climate has come crashing back down with a week of solid rain. However, today looked promising so I ventured out of Kendal towards the Southern Lake District, up through the Duddon valley and up and over the Wrynose Pass back home.
Though it’s rained today, the winds have been so strong that any shower has usually blown over in five minutes. This also caused lots of cloud breakages, spilling golden shafts of sunlight every now and then to create some awesome lighting for landscape photography.
Here’s a shot I got from the near the summit of Wrynose Pass (1,281ft) looking east. The mountain pass takes you from Little Langdale in the east all the way to Eskdale in the west via the infamous Harknott Pass, bisecting the Furness Fells from the Crinkle Crags/Bowfell massif. I waited for a good 15 minutes with this composition before the light was to my liking; the sun opening up behind me to the left, with the distant mountains still secluded in stormy clouds. You can see the Wrynose Pass road wind all the way down the fells before abruptly rising again as Hardknott Pass, Britain’s steepest road.
Wrynose Pass, Lake District, Cumbria, England.
Camera: Nikon D7000
Lens: Tokina AT-X 116 PRO DX (AF 11-16mm f/2.8)
Filters: Hoya PRO-1 Circular Polariser
ISO: 100
Aperture: f/13
Focal Length: 13mm
Shutter Speeds: 1/100, 1/30 and 1/8secs
“The Dividing Road” by Ian Hex of LightSweep is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. Based on a work at http://www.lightsweep.co.uk.
If you like the way my photos look, I have a free HDR photography tutorial using free and open-source software, so it costs you nothing!
Full-res versions of the photo for personal PC/mobile wallpaper use, as well as enquiries for prints, are available by request, just ask me.

The Dividing Road

We’ve entered into that interesting cusp between Summer and Autumn, where the colours of the landscape, along with the weather, start to change. After just over two months of glorious sunshine, a harsh reminder of the UK climate has come crashing back down with a week of solid rain. However, today looked promising so I ventured out of Kendal towards the Southern Lake District, up through the Duddon valley and up and over the Wrynose Pass back home.

Though it’s rained today, the winds have been so strong that any shower has usually blown over in five minutes. This also caused lots of cloud breakages, spilling golden shafts of sunlight every now and then to create some awesome lighting for landscape photography.

Here’s a shot I got from the near the summit of Wrynose Pass (1,281ft) looking east. The mountain pass takes you from Little Langdale in the east all the way to Eskdale in the west via the infamous Harknott Pass, bisecting the Furness Fells from the Crinkle Crags/Bowfell massif. I waited for a good 15 minutes with this composition before the light was to my liking; the sun opening up behind me to the left, with the distant mountains still secluded in stormy clouds. You can see the Wrynose Pass road wind all the way down the fells before abruptly rising again as Hardknott Pass, Britain’s steepest road.

Wrynose Pass, Lake District, Cumbria, England.

  • Camera: Nikon D7000
  • Lens: Tokina AT-X 116 PRO DX (AF 11-16mm f/2.8)
  • Filters: Hoya PRO-1 Circular Polariser
  • ISO: 100
  • Aperture: f/13
  • Focal Length: 13mm
  • Shutter Speeds: 1/100, 1/30 and 1/8secs

Creative Commons Licence
“The Dividing Road” by Ian Hex of LightSweep is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. Based on a work at http://www.lightsweep.co.uk.

If you like the way my photos look, I have a free HDR photography tutorial using free and open-source software, so it costs you nothing!

Full-res versions of the photo for personal PC/mobile wallpaper use, as well as enquiries for prints, are available by request, just ask me.

Natural Perfection
A giant panorama of the epic chasm valley of High Cup Nick, shot during a hazy summer’s sunset.
High Cup Nick, North Pennines, Cumbria, England.
Camera: Nikon D7000
Lens: Tokina AT-X 116 PRO DX (AF 11-16mm f/2.8)
ISO: 100
Aperture: f/16
Focal Length: 11mm
Shutter Speeds: 1/13, 1/3, and 1.3secs
Other: A composition made of three vertical frames stitched together to showcase the complete scope of the valley.
“Natural Perfection” by Ian Hex of LightSweep is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. Based on a work at http://www.lightsweep.co.uk.
If you like the way my photos look, I have a free HDR photography tutorial using free and open-source software, so it costs you nothing!
Full-res versions of the photo for personal PC/mobile wallpaper use, as well as enquiries for prints, are available by request, just ask me.

Natural Perfection

A giant panorama of the epic chasm valley of High Cup Nick, shot during a hazy summer’s sunset.

High Cup Nick, North Pennines, Cumbria, England.

  • Camera: Nikon D7000
  • Lens: Tokina AT-X 116 PRO DX (AF 11-16mm f/2.8)
  • ISO: 100
  • Aperture: f/16
  • Focal Length: 11mm
  • Shutter Speeds: 1/13, 1/3, and 1.3secs
  • Other: A composition made of three vertical frames stitched together to showcase the complete scope of the valley.

Creative Commons Licence
“Natural Perfection” by Ian Hex of LightSweep is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. Based on a work at http://www.lightsweep.co.uk.

If you like the way my photos look, I have a free HDR photography tutorial using free and open-source software, so it costs you nothing!

Full-res versions of the photo for personal PC/mobile wallpaper use, as well as enquiries for prints, are available by request, just ask me.

Source of Ullswater
The magical Aira Force, one of the Lake District’s most well-known waterfalls. The river that flows through these falls, Aira Beck, starts 2,362ft up at Stybarrow Dodd; shortly before joining England’s second largest lake, Ullswater, it falls 66ft down this ravine. The bridge at the top of the falls also offers exceptional views. A wonderful golden evening of warm light and cool water. =)
Aira Force, Gowbarrow Park, Ullswater, Lake District, Cumbria, England.
Camera: Nikon D7000
Lens: Tokina AT-X 116 PRO DX (AF 11-16mm f/2.8)
Filters: Hoya PRO-1 Circular Polariser
ISO: 100
Aperture: f/11
Focal Length: 13mm
Shutter Speeds: 1/4, 1.0 and 4.0secs (bottom frame); 1/5, 0.8, 3.0 and 13secs (top frame)
Other: The final photo is a blend of two compositions, stitched together for a greater view of the scene.
“Source of Ullswater” by Ian Hex of LightSweep is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. Based on a work at http://www.lightsweep.co.uk.
If you like the way my photos look, I have a free HDR photography tutorial using free and open-source software, so it costs you nothing!
Full-res versions of the photo for personal PC/mobile wallpaper use, as well as enquiries for prints, are available by request, just ask me.

Source of Ullswater

The magical Aira Force, one of the Lake District’s most well-known waterfalls. The river that flows through these falls, Aira Beck, starts 2,362ft up at Stybarrow Dodd; shortly before joining England’s second largest lake, Ullswater, it falls 66ft down this ravine. The bridge at the top of the falls also offers exceptional views. A wonderful golden evening of warm light and cool water. =)

Aira Force, Gowbarrow Park, Ullswater, Lake District, Cumbria, England.

  • Camera: Nikon D7000
  • Lens: Tokina AT-X 116 PRO DX (AF 11-16mm f/2.8)
  • Filters: Hoya PRO-1 Circular Polariser
  • ISO: 100
  • Aperture: f/11
  • Focal Length: 13mm
  • Shutter Speeds: 1/4, 1.0 and 4.0secs (bottom frame); 1/5, 0.8, 3.0 and 13secs (top frame)
  • Other: The final photo is a blend of two compositions, stitched together for a greater view of the scene.

Creative Commons Licence
“Source of Ullswater” by Ian Hex of LightSweep is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. Based on a work at http://www.lightsweep.co.uk.

If you like the way my photos look, I have a free HDR photography tutorial using free and open-source software, so it costs you nothing!

Full-res versions of the photo for personal PC/mobile wallpaper use, as well as enquiries for prints, are available by request, just ask me.

On you OSS HDR tutorial I noticed a truck on the left side of the image in the screenshots from darktable. Would you mind explaining how you removed it?

Anonymous

I used GIMP’s Heal Clone Tool to brush it out. =)

The Stormy Shore
Storm clouds gather around the setting sun at Windermere like wolves circling a deer. 
Windermere, Lake District, Cumbria, England.
Camera: Nikon D7000
Lens: Tokina AT-X 116 PRO DX (AF 11-16mm f/2.8)
Filters: Hoya PRO-1 Circular Polariser
ISO: 100
Aperture: f/22
Focal Length: 16mm
Shutter Speeds: 1/60, 1/15 and 1/4secs
Other: a blend of exposures using the Enfuse function of Hugin. Water rendered with G’MIC’s “Dream Smooth” filter.
“The Stormy Shore” by Ian Hex of LightSweep is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. Based on a work at http://www.lightsweep.co.uk.
If you like the way my photos look, I have a free HDR photography tutorial using free and open-source software, so it costs you nothing!
Full-res versions of the photo for personal PC/mobile wallpaper use, as well as enquiries for prints, are available by request, just ask me.

The Stormy Shore

Storm clouds gather around the setting sun at Windermere like wolves circling a deer. 

Windermere, Lake District, Cumbria, England.

  • Camera: Nikon D7000
  • Lens: Tokina AT-X 116 PRO DX (AF 11-16mm f/2.8)
  • Filters: Hoya PRO-1 Circular Polariser
  • ISO: 100
  • Aperture: f/22
  • Focal Length: 16mm
  • Shutter Speeds: 1/60, 1/15 and 1/4secs
  • Other: a blend of exposures using the Enfuse function of Hugin. Water rendered with G’MIC’s “Dream Smooth” filter.

Creative Commons Licence
“The Stormy Shore” by Ian Hex of LightSweep is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. Based on a work at http://www.lightsweep.co.uk.

If you like the way my photos look, I have a free HDR photography tutorial using free and open-source software, so it costs you nothing!

Full-res versions of the photo for personal PC/mobile wallpaper use, as well as enquiries for prints, are available by request, just ask me.

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